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Commercial haulers can be found just about everywhere in Connecticut. The demand for supplies and consumers goods is high, and, as such, the trucking industry is booming. With so many big rigs out on the road, unsecured and overloaded trucks are certainly a valid safety concern.

The trucking industry is guided by numerous rules and regulations. These are in place to protect business owners, employees and the general public. If these rules and regulations are not followed, not only do commercial vehicles pose a safety risk to other drivers on the road, but also owners of these big rigs open themselves up to serious legal problems.

Cargo securement and weight restrictions are just a few of the many regulations put on the trucking industry. It only takes passing an over-sized hauler once to see that, if the cargo is not properly secured, a lot of people could get hurt should that cargo become loose. Part of the rules regarding securement include using approved tie-downs, using appropriate anchor points and using the accurate number of tie-downs for the cargo weight. Along with properly securing cargo for transport, it is also important to adhere to weight limits.

If cargo is not secured appropriately, or if a truck is carrying more weight than allowed, the risk of accident and injury greatly increase. Connecticut residents who have been injured in a truck accident, due to falling cargo from unsecured or overloaded trucks or any other reason, may be entitled to pursue legal action against the truck driver and/or his or her employer. Compensation for damages suffered may be granted for claims that are successfully litigated in a civil court.

Source: fmcsa.dot.gov, “Cargo Securement Rules“, Dec. 19, 2014

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